WOD

Sunday

CrossFit Roadhouse – RH+30 View Public Whiteboard Workout Metcon (No Measure) 3 Rounds 2:00 Stations No Rest b/t Stations 1:00 Rest b/t Rounds STATION 1 AMRAP 10 Box Jumps 12 V-Ups STATION 2 EMOM 15 Burpees STATION 3 AMRAP 10 Box Jumps 12 DB Push Press STATION 4 EMOM 15 KB Swing

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Saturday

CrossFit Roadhouse – RH+30 View Public Whiteboard Workout Metcon (No Measure) 1 Round 5:00 Stations 1:00 Rest b/t Stations STATION 1 EMOM 10 Cal Bike STATION 2 EMOM 25 Double Unders + 10 DB Deadlift STATION 3 AMRAP 5 Renegade Rows 10 DB Ground to Overhead

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Friday

CrossFit Roadhouse – RH+30 View Public Whiteboard Workout Metcon (No Measure) 3 Rounds 1:00 Stations :20 transition b/t Stations 1:00 Rest b/t Rounds STATION 1 Max KB Sumo DL High Pull STATION 2 :30 Max Russian Twists :30 Hollow Rocks STATION 3 Max KB Box Step Ups STATION 4 :30 Shoulder Taps :30 Mtn Climbers

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Friday

CrossFit Roadhouse – CrossFit View Public Whiteboard Warm-up Warm-up (No Measure) Team 1k Row!! In teams of 2…alternate every 250m. While Partner 1 rows, Partner 2 is performing flow stretching (5 Reps of Bootstrapper Squat & 5 Reps of Push-up to Down-Dog) With the Same Partner… AMRAP x 5 MINUTES 5 Burpees in-sync 10 Sit-ups in sync 15 Air Squat + Jumping Jack in-sync* *1 Rep = 1 Air Squat + 1 Jumping Jack for 15 total. Workout CFRH Baseline – Aerobic (Time) ON A 12:00 RUNNING CLOCK… Run 1 Mile then in Remaining Time Max Meters on Rower**Last Seen 9/25/19 Please also record mile time. CFRH Baseline – Bodyweight (AMRAP – Rounds and Reps) AMRAP x 12 MINUTES 6 Strict Pull-ups 12 Hand Release Push-ups 18 Sit-ups

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Thursday

CrossFit Roadhouse – RH+30 View Public Whiteboard Workout Metcon (No Measure) 2 Rounds 3:00 Stations No Rest b/t Stations 1:00 Rest b/t Rounds STATION 1 1:30 Max Distance Row 1:30 Recovery Row STATION 2 AMRAP 20 Lunges 10 DB Strict Press STATION 3 1:30 Max Distance Bike 1:30 Recovery Bike

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Wednesday

CrossFit Roadhouse – RH+30 View Public Whiteboard Workout Metcon (No Measure) 1 Round 3:00 Stations 1:00 Rest b/t Stations STATION 1 EMOM 15 Slam Balls STATION 2 EMOM 30 Double Unders STATION 3 EMOM 15 Wall Balls STATION 4 EMOM 30 Double Unders

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Tuesday

CrossFit Roadhouse – RH+30 View Public Whiteboard Workout Metcon (No Measure) 3 Rounds 1:30 Stations :30 Rest b/t Stations No Rest b/t Rounds STATION 1 :30 Max Cal Bike or Row :30 Rest :30 Max Cal Bike or Row STATION 2 AMRAP 5 Box Jumps 5 KBS STATION 3 :30 Max Cal Bike or Row :30 Rest :30 Max Cal Bike or Row STATION 4 AMRAP 5 Box Jumps 5 Push-Ups

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Tuesday

CrossFit Roadhouse – NC60 View Public Whiteboard Warm-up Warm-up (No Measure) 3 ROUNDS 8/6 Cal Bike 8 Up-Down Step Ups 10 Good Mornings Into… 3 ROUNDS w/ empty barbell 5 RDLs 5 Hang Muscle Cleans 5 Hang Power Cleans 5 Box Jumps (build in height every round) Strength Hang Power Clean (3×3) FOR LOAD 3×3* Hang Power Clean *Goal is heavier than the final set of loading in the workout. (Score is Weight) Workout Metcon (Time) FOR TIME* 15-12-9 Hang Power Clean (95/65)|(65/45) Box Jump (24) into… 12-9-6 Hang Power Clean (135/95)|(95/65) Box Jump (30) into… 9-6-3 Hang Power Clean (185/125)|(135/95) Box Jump (30+) *Heights are the same for all athletes. Goal is three increasing heights for the Box Jump. (Score is Time)

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How To Breathe When Squatting

Welcome back to Squat University! Last week we discussed how to teach the perfect bodyweight squat. We talked about a strategy to maintain stability during a bodyweight squat and that is holding our arms out in front of us. By doing this, it brings our lower back (lumbar spine into a good neutral position. In order to maintain the integrity of our posture when we squat with a barbell we need to adapt our technique. A barbell places higher demand on our body to stabilize our trunk. In order to meet these demands we need to find a way to increase our stability. A stable core is the platform for which we can perform efficient powerful movements on.   Core Stability The quality of our movement during the squat is dictated by how stable we maintain our trunk. A bare spine, without any muscles, is nothing but a stack of bones. Without the continuous collaboration of the 29 pairs of muscles that make up our trunk and the fascia that holds them together, the weight of our upper body alone would be enough to collapse our spine (3). Very often, we see athletes believe that they can improve trunk stability through exercises such as sit-ups or crunches. In reality those movements build isolated muscular strength, not stability. There is a difference between strength and the ability to stabilize. Strength is the ability to produce force. The harder you can push or pull a weight, the stronger your muscles are. Stability is the ability to resist movement at one part of our body while movement takes place around it. A stable spine resists being bent in two by the massive weight of the barbell. Strengthening a stabilizer (such as the abdominal muscles with crunches or the low back erectors with endless hyperextensions) will not cause those muscles to necessarily stabilize more effectively. Core stability is the synchronous action of the abdominal muscles along with the muscles of the back, hip, pelvic girdle, diaphragm and surrounding fascia. When working together they keep the spine in a safe and stable position while we move. Therefore, core stability has nothing to do with how many crunches you perform or hypers off the glut-ham machine. The essence of stability is based on two things: timing and coordinated recruitment. In order to recruit our core muscles prior to the squat the cue to “brace for a punch” is recommended. This action increases the stability of our lower back and locks it into a good neutral position. When we turn-on these muscles prior to the descent of the squat we proactively prepare our body to handle the load that we are trying to carry. Proper Breathing It is not enough to only brace for a punch when we squat. If you want to move massive weights in a safe manner you must also learn how to breathe properly. For too long, professionals in the strength and medical field have failed to incorporate proper breathing during lifts. Many have essentially approached our core like a balloon; trying to strengthen the outside rubber walls instead of learning how to increase the pressure within! Fitness and medical professionals are taught, “Breathe in on the way down and breathe out on the way up.” This is fine for an exercise involving lightweight and higher repetitions (i.e., bench press 3 sets of 10 reps). This breathing mechanic however is not entirely recommended when performing the barbell squat. Can you imagine what would happen if a powerlifter let out his entire breath on the way up from squatting 1,000 lbs? When we squat heavy weight with a barbell (for example anything over 80% of your 1 rep-maximum), it is advised to take a large breath and hold it through the entire repetition. Usually this type of breathing is not needed for higher repetition sets with low weight. However, when you are squatting heavy for a few reps it is crucial. This breath should be taken prior to and in coordination with the cue to “brace for a punch”. Doing so allows us to dramatically stabilize our core. To learn how to properly breathe during the squat, try this simple test. Place one hand on your stomach and another on your side (near your lower ribs). Now take a big breath. If you did this properly you will feel your stomach rise and fall. You will also feel your lower rib cage expand laterally (out to the side). Essentially you are feeling the volume increasing inside your core. When we take a big breath the diaphragm just below our lungs contracts and will descend towards our stomach (1).   If you breathe improperly, you will instead notice the chest rise and fall. Breathing in this manner does little to increase the volume of our intra-abdominal cavity because the diaphragm is never fully utilized. So why is this rise in volume so important? When we correctly breathe “into our stomach” and combine the action with bracing our core we find something special happens. With your hand on your stomach again, take a big breath one more time. After the breath is taken, brace your core muscles as if you are about to receive a Mike Tyson punch to the gut. Combining these actions increases the pressure inside the abdominal cavity (intra-abdominal pressure or IAP). This is because the volume can no longer expand. This must be done in a step-by-step manner. If we brace first and then try to take a big breath, we limit how much pressure we can create. This is because the diaphragm cannot fully contract and descend if the core is already maximally braced. Increasing IAP in this manner helps stabilize the lower spine to an even greater degree than with bracing alone (3). To experience the connection between the pressure in your core and your overall strength, try this simple test. Put a barbell on your back and exhale all of the air from your lungs. Feel for how the

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