WOD

2nd July Thursday

Warmup • 500 m Row 3 Rounds Not For Time: • 15 Jumping Jacks • 15 Air Squats • 15 Mountain Climbers Core 6 Rounds: • :20 Handstand Hold • :10 Rest • :20 Pull-up Hold • :10 Rest • :20 L-Sit Hold • :10 Rest Strength Front Squat • 5 reps @60% of 1RM • 5 reps @70% of 1RM • 5 reps @80% of 1RM Clean & Jerk • 5 reps @60% of 1RM • 5 reps @70% of 1RM • 5 reps @80% of 1RM Conditioning 12 Minute AMRAP: • Hang Power Clean 95/65# • Push Press • Front Rack Walking Lunge Reps: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 + … Penalty: 5 bar facing burpees any time the barbell touches the ground.

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1st July Wednesday

Warmup • 30 PVC Passthroughs • 20 PVC Good Mornings • 10 PVC Overhead Squats 3 Rounds of “Cindy”: • 5 Pull-ups • 10 Push-ups • 15 Air Squats Core 4 Rounds of: • 10 Hollow Rocks • 8 Roll to Candle Stick • 6 Strict Toes to Bar Strength Shoulder Press • 5 reps @60% of 1RM • 5 reps @70% of 1RM • 5 reps @80% of 1RM Bench Press • 5 reps @60% of 1RM • 5 reps @70% of 1RM • 5 reps @80% of 1RM push ups banded • 2 sets of Max Effort Conditioning 4 Rounds for time: • 10 calorie row • 15 Hand Stand Push-ups • 20 Kettlebell Swings 70/53#

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30th June Tuesday

Warm-up • 300 m Row • 20 Air Squats • 15 Dumbbell Thrusters 20/10#x2 • 10 Front-to-back Leg Swings /leg • 10 Side-to-side Leg Swings /leg 2 rounds: • 30 sec Squat Hold • 30 sec Straddle Stretch • 30 sec Pigeon Pose Right • 30 sec Pigeon Pose Left Strength Front Squat • 5 reps at 60% of 1RM • 5 reps at 65% of 1RM • 5 reps at 70% of 1RM • 5 reps at 70% of 1RM Back Squat • 4 reps at 75% of 1RM • 4 reps at 80% of 1RM • 4 reps at 80% of 1RM • 4 reps at 80% of 1RM Core • 50 Hollow Body Rocks Then 21-15-9 reps: • Bench Knee Raises • GHD Sit-ups Conditioning 3 rounds for max reps: • 1 min Burpees • 1 min Hang Squat Clean 155/105# • 1 min Burpees • 1 min Handstand Push-ups  

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29th June Monday

Warm-up 2 rounds: • 15 cal row/ 20DU • 15 PVC Passthroughs • 15 PVC Good Mornings • 15 PVC Overhead Squats 3 rounds: • 30 sec Pec Stretch w/ Band Right • 30 sec Pec Stretch w/ Band Left • 30 sec Spiderman Lunge Right • 30 sec Spiderman Lunge Left With an empty barbell: • 10 Overhead Squats 45/35# • 10 Thrusters 45/35# Strength Overhead Squat • 3 reps @ 60% of 1RM • 2 reps @ 70% of 1RM • 1 reps @ 80% of 1RM • 1 rep @ 90% of 1RM • 1 rep @ 100%+ of 1RM Thruster • 3 reps @ 60% of 1RM • 2 reps @ 70% of 1RM • 1 reps @ 80% of 1RM • 1 rep @ 90% of 1RM • 1 rep @ 100%+ of 1RM Conditioning “FRAN” 21-15-9 Thrusters 95/65 PULLUPS

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Competition nutrition for dumbells

Just as there are nutritional considerations when it comes to body composition and health, there are nutritional considerations when it comes to athletic output and optimal physical performance. At Roadhouse , I’ve seen far too many athletes think that their strenuous activity level negates any obligation to be calculated when it comes to nutrition, and the opposite couldn’t be more true. The higher the level of athleticism, and the more important your level of competition, the more calculated you need to be in order to ensure your body is fueled properly to kick ass when the time comes. The last thing you want to do is pour months of dedication and effort into preparing for a competition only to ruin the comp day by not feeding your body what it needs to perform. GENERAL GUIDELINES: Competition nutrition is HIGHLY individualized. There is no “one way” to address it. However, when it comes to CrossFit, Powerlifting, or Strongman considerations, you are faced with a unique experience in that your competition day is littered with several “events” or “wods”. It’s not a single race or a single physical requirement- it is a competition comprised of multiple workouts or strenuous sessions over the course of a day or several days and this makes for a unique experience. The following points are suggestions or guidelines to help you figure out how to go about tweaking your own pre competition nutrition. These are tips or principles I use with my Predator-Diet clients, and I’ve found they prove very effective: Don’t wait until competition time to “try” your nutrition. I suggest a trial run a few months or weeks out from your competition.  Take your body through your “pre competition nutrition” to make sure things flow smoothly and optimally. Pay special attention to how you feel and how your body responds so you can adjust if needed. If it ain’t broke don’t fix it. FAR too often I see athletes try to get fancy when it comes to pre competition nutrition. In all reality the LESS change, the better. You’ll want to pick foods that your body is used to, foods it knows and metabolizes well. You don’t want to experiment with new and interesting foods and methods if your body isn’t used to it. When planning pre competition nutrition stick to foods that are common place in your diet. Look to foods that make you feel good, help you perform to your standards and foods that are “easy” to consume. Digestion is king. You want to look to foods that are EASILY digested by the body. Digestion takes a lot of energy, and the last thing you want to do when you’re staring a competition in the face is thwart valuable energy to a bodily process like digestion. That energy is going to be needed for the physical activity coming. Poor digestion or digestive upset is also something you don’t want to be dealing with when it comes to competing- if your stomach is upset or struggling it WILL affect your performance.  For example, rather than a whole banana or whole yam, I tend to use baby food  variations of these items in the pre comp/intra comp protocols of my crossfitters, powerlifters, and strongmen for this very reason. It’s broken down, condensed and low in volume and easily digestible. Food volume is the enemy. You do not want to be weighed down with a large volume meal. Training with a belly bloat is simply uncomfortable. I tend to eliminate lots of high volume foods or suggest athletes do so. Eating a huge salad with chicken might seem logical, if it’s something you commonly eat, but you want to look to items that are low in volume yet nutrient dense, food items that are easily digestible, and items that are easy to transport or carry with you on the day of your competition. The Days and Nights before a Competition The week before a competition is usually when I begin to “tweak” an athlete’s nutrition. At 7 days out is a good time to work with bland, plain or easily digestible food items.  I keep ratios of carbs, proteins, and fats similar to the ratios that athlete has been using. I do not tweak too much. At about 3 days out I begin to adjust the macros of an athlete. The three to four days out mark from an event is critical for success. A high level of athletic performance can be maintained throughout the contest if the body is given 48- to 72-hours to properly hydrate and fuel. This is a good time to stock the carbohydrate stores so that you do not enter into strenuous competition glycogen depleted. Glycogen is a form of sugar stored in the muscle and the liver and it is the main source of energy in high intensity activity like CrossFit. The most important consideration in a pre-event meal is to eat enough carbohydrates to refill the muscle and liver stores. Water is the other critical factor in the glycogen storage process. The body needs water in order to store glycogen in the muscles and the liver. The ability to produce speed and power over a period of time is dependent on how much glycogen is available to the muscles. I reduce the amount of fats and protein consumed by the athlete and I re-direct those calories into good carbohydrate sources. Meals two nights before leading up to a competition should be higher in good carbs and low in fat.  I tend to use the 1/3 to 2/3 ratio of protein to carbs so that glycogen storage can occur. I like to use sweet potato, white jasmine rice, cream of rice, and baby food because of their high digestability. Since these items are already broken down they’re easily assimilated by the body and will not steal valuable energy for the metabolizing and breaking down of food for fuel.   I also encourage my athletes to drink lots of fluid with each

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26th June Friday

Warm-up • 300 m Row 3 rounds: • 10 Air Squats • 10 m High Knees • 10 m Butt Kicks 2 rounds: • 30 sec Pike Stretch • 30 sec Straddle Stretch • 30 sec Pigeon Pose Right • 30 sec Pigeon Pose Left Conditioning Falkek run 1 set 3.3.2.3.1.3 Core 4 rounds: • 20 sec Ball Slams • 10 sec Rest • 20 sec Flutter Kicks • 10 sec Rest Conditioning 15 min AMRAP: • 10  Burpee Box Over 20” • 10 Deadlifts 205/145# • 400 m Run

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Olympic Weightlifting Movements

As complicated as Olympic weightlifting movements may seem, they really are simple. Some athletes might disagree when I say that the snatch is easier to learn than the clean and jerk. Why? Because they don’t feel a sense of control with their center of gravity. Remember, an object’s center of gravity isn’t the ‘center’ of the object, but rather the point where the object can be balanced. As it relates to your body and the barbell during a lift, your center of gravity (or weight distribution) will always shift towards whichever is heavier. So when the bar is light, the center of gravity shifts towards your body. However, when the bar has heavy load, it will move towards the barbell. This is why it takes strength, coupled with speed, to keep us from leaning forward during these lifts. The overhead movement in the snatch challenges our sense of balance. Let’s break down some common mistakes, to help you find the joy in the snatch. Mistake #1: Jumping forward The most common mistake athletes make. When performing the snatch your feet can do one of two things: stay in one spot or hop back a little—and I mean a little; given that we receive the bar just behind our heads, moving back may be natural. What you should never do is jump forward, breaking the frontal plane. Doing so makes the bar feel heavier—and much harder to chase. 3 times you might make the mistake of jumping forward: 1. During liftoff, because you are: a) distributing your weight onto your toes in your initial pull as a result of bending your elbows early, your knees being too far forward, or no core activation; or b) not completely active— allowing your hips to rise prior to the bar leaving the ground, which may cause you to lean forward. Whether it’s weight distribution to the toes or fast hips shooting up, any forward movement at this stage of the lift throws you off course– making you jump forward even if the rest of your technique is spot on. Corrections & Cues Drive your heels into the floor when picking up the bar. Though you can set up on mid-foot, once you start lifting do not lean back—keep your weight on your heels. Remember to move your hips at the same time as you move the bar. Your hips shooting up faster will cause you to lean forward. Keep your chest up as you lift and focus on a spot right in front or slightly above your line of sight, to ensure you stay on your heels. 2. During the transition, because you are: shifting your hips too far into the bar; or simply shifting your weight to your toes too early during the transition, therefore having to jump forward to catch the bar. Remember, the bar must come back into your body, not your body into the bar. Corrections & Cues Practice hang snatches—specifically mid-hang (above knee) and high-hang (mid quadriceps). Starting from the hang will force you to use proper mechanics. Practice romanian deadlifts to work the posterior chain and focus on proper heel distribution at a slower pace than that of the snatch. Have a coach cue you to delay your jump (triple extension aka 2nd pull) and to be patient during your transition. Don’t rush. Trust the movement. 3. During the 2nd pull, because you are: not keeping the bar close to your body. You keep control of the bar the closer to you it is. If the bar hits your hips the contact should be up not out. Corrections & Cues Practice the power position snatch—it’s fastest way to fix this mistake. You’ll find it nearly impossible to do this lift right if you are letting the bar out too far. You can also try dip snatches and high pulls. Have a coach cue to you to remain vertical, to aim for your chin and to use more leg drive rather than hips. Less hips, more legs. Common Snatch Mistakes Arm Bending Mistake #2: Bending your arms During the snatch, bending your arms too soon can result in a loss of power. Some tension and slight bending of the arm is okay if you keep that bend all the way into the receiving position. The wrong type of ‘arm bending’ is when you straighten your arms during the jump, and bend them a second time. This bend, straighten, then re-bend is what causes a loss of velocity. Either the bar will slow down or you will develop a hitch at the hips and stop. Corrections & Cues Don’t worry about your arms. Focus on the power position and using your legs. Athletes sometimes bend their arms to generate velocity and explosion but that’s exactly what the power position will do for you. Practice power position snatches to get the feel of proper leg explosion without using your arm. Focus on your legs. Use blocks. Starting high without any preloading of the legs, as in a hang, will help you focus on the lower body doing more work. Mistake #3: Not getting under the bar For those learning the snatch, getting under the bar is crucial. For many it’s a matter of fear, but for others it’s a matter of mobility. Once you overcome your hurdle, the goal is to get comfortable down there. You don’t have to hit the bottom, but the further you get the better. Newer athletes tend to focus on getting the bar overhead whereas the experienced athletes focus on dropping under. It does you no good to have a massive pull of the bar if it’s not coupled with the ability to get under it. It’s a two part equation. Having one without the other will limit you. Lastly, when you get into that overhead squat position you must stay tight. As USA Weightlifting says: “all body levers must be tight.” It’s a wasted effort to have perfect technique yet lose an attempt because you

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25th June Thursday

Warm-up • 400 m Run • 20 Scorpions • 20 PVC Passthroughs • 20 PVC Good Mornings • 20 PVC Overhead Squats 3 rounds of: • 30 sec Spiderman Lunge Right • 30 sec Spiderman Lunge Left • 30 sec Pec Stretch w/ Band Right • 30 sec Pec Stretch w/ Band Left Strength Snatch • 3 reps at 75% of 1RM • 2 reps at 85% of 1RM • 1 rep at 90% of 1RM • 1 rep at 95% of 1RM • 1 rep at 98% of 1RM 3-Position Snatch (upper thigh, below knee, floor) • 3 reps at 60% of 1RM Snatch • 2 reps at 70% of 1RM Snatch • 2 reps at 75% of 1RM Snatch Conditioning 5 rounds for time: • 15 Wallballs 20/14# • 10 Toes-to-bar • 5 Snatch 115/75#

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Reebok commercials featuring ultra-fit 20

Maybe you’ve seen the Reebok commercials featuring ultra-fit 20-somethings sprinting and throwing weight around, jumping and sweating. Or perhaps you’ve driven by the local CrossFit gym where the muscled, shirtless specimens lie writhing on the ground after a particularly grueling circuit. It all looks very intimidating, but there’s something missing from this hardcore fitness vision: CrossFit is trying very hard to be — and can be — for everyone. Those with even a bit of athletic experience have a real shot to excel in the CrossFit world, in which conditioning, bodyweight exercises and weightlifting are often combined into a single Workout of the Day (aka WOD). More important, these WODs are designed to be infinitely scalable, so you don’t need to be built like Hulk or run like the Flash to complete the day’s programming. A good CrossFit trainer knows his or her members and will easily scale down (or up) a workout based on abilities, placing everyone in the group on a competitive level. Whether you’re an experienced weightlifter, runner, gymnast, yoga enthusiast or simply a weekend warrior, CrossFit boxes across the country have seen athletes like you do quite well. And even if you’re not willing to completely abandon your current fitness regimen, spending a day or two a week training in a CrossFit box can only enhance your skills and conditioning, making you that much more proficient in your chosen fitness field. So are you ready to take the leap into a brand-new type of training? Here’s what you’ll need to know. The Weightlifter Weightlifter Those coming from a weightlifting background, whether it’s powerlifting, Olympic lifting or even a standard gym-based circuit, have two big advantages walking into a CrossFit affiliate. First, you’ll have a built-in strength base from which to draw when hitting the WOD. Whether it’s strength-only or a conditioning day, CrossFit workouts typically incorporate weight training into a session. Second, you’ll bring a valuable set of skills to the CrossFit box. “If you understand how to properly do things like bench, squat, deadlift and military-press, you’ll pick up the CrossFit skills much, much faster,” says Zach Even-Esh, owner of the Underground Strength Gym in Edison, N.J., and a CrossFit-certified instructor. “Teaching someone to squat or power clean is tough, so if you have that as your foundation, you’ll also make the transition into the [conditioning] stuff more easily.” That conditioning is likely the biggest hurdle for lifters, especially coming from a strength-based program with little or no focus on high-intensity training. Moving heavy weight at a high heart rate can be shocking initially, but if you and your CrossFit coaches are patient in developing that new area, you’ll enjoy a more balanced and developed athleticism than you get from weight training alone. And don’t worry, you won’t be bored. There are still be plenty of CrossFit-centric skills to learn, like kipping pull-ups, rope climbs, rowing and box jumping. “You’ll love learning these new skills, too,” Even-Esh says. The Runner Running Because many CrossFit WODs include running — typically of distances between 400 and 5,000 meters — runners also bring a unique set of talents to the CrossFit box, most of which will help in taking on the new program. A good runner will have the capacity to maintain solid running form and speed even as he or she tires rather than shuffling through the running portion of a workout. And you’ll live for the days your coaches program a running-only workout. There is also a familiar link between endurance training and many of CrossFit’s most brutal workouts. “Mentally, runners understand endurance, suffering and perseverance,” says Brian MacKenzie, founder of the CrossFit Endurance program. “All things that will be needed for CrossFit.” Running is also a solitary sport in which your competing mainly against your own times but also against other race participants. CrossFit workouts are similarly designed, inducing competition between and among gym members. If you’ve ever attempted to set a personal record in a race, you’ll bring a degree of intensity to a CrossFit program that many athletes don’t initially understand they’ll need. Unfortunately, many runners do lack experience in weightlifting. And because running is often your only focus, you may not have the core stability or overall motor skills required to complete a lift efficiently. That means you can expect to spend a lot of time challenging your body to learn an entirely new muscular skill set. Fortunately, the traits you’ll be picking up are key not only to CrossFit but also to most athletic pursuits. Yes, even running. Especially running. By attacking your weaknesses, you’ll get stronger, your mechanics will improve with those motor skills, and you’ll likely become a faster runner as a result. The Gymnast Gymnastic “The learning curve for a gymnast is much shorter than for other athletes coming in,” says Carl Paoli, founder of GymnasticsWOD.com and Naka Athletics, and a CrossFit strength-and-conditioning coach. What further evidence, admittedly anecdotal, do you need than that embodied by 2011 Reebok CrossFit Games champion Annie Thorisdottir? A former elite gymnast, Thorisdottir qualified for the Icelandic national team when she was 15 years old, and she was named “fittest on earth” last year, taking home $50,000 from the Reebok CrossFit Games. Gymnasts typically have a successful transition because they understand body movement, Paoli says. Former gymnasts seem to have an innate ability to know the position the body must be in to apply the maximum force to lift weights, complete a box jump or myriad other CrossFit-centric exercises. “You’ve already experienced these movements in some way before, so you see how they translate to CrossFit,” Paoli says. While gymnasts typically walk in with proficiency in three of the four major CrossFit fitness domains (flexibility, endurance and stamina), most are sorely lacking in strength, having rarely if ever trained beyond bodyweight exercises. However, because of their abilities, gymnasts can quickly learn how to lift with flawless form and often end up getting stronger more quickly than most athletes. And because gymnastic movements like

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CrossFit Roadhouse

WOD

Warm-up 2 rounds: • 200 m Run • 10 cal row 2 rounds: • 30 sec Samson Stretch Right • 30 sec Samson Stretch Left • 30 sec Side Lunge Right • 30 sec Side Lunge Left 3 rounds: • 6 Russian KB Swings 70/53# • 12 KB Goblet Squats 70/53# Strength Front Squat • 5 reps at 60% of 1RM • 5 reps at 65% of 1RM • 5 reps at 70% of 1RM • 5 reps at 70% of 1RM Back Squat • 6 reps at 65% of 1RM • 6 reps at 75% of 1RM • 6 reps at 80% of 1RM • 6 reps at 80% of 1RM Core • 50  Sit-ups • 50 superman Conditioning 21-15-11-9 Kbs 53/35 Push press 95/65/55

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